ICYMI: Los Angeles Updates Its Phase 2 Cannabis Licensing Process

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los ángeles cannabis licensingThe ups, downs, and unknowns around L.A. cannabis licensing have abounded from the passage of Measure M back in March 2017. This is not uncommon, especially in large cities, as regulators determine how to handle things on the fly and as issues arise (see, for example, social equity in L.A. and the ability to re-locate for Existing Medical Marijuana Dispensaries (“EMMDs“). L.A., to its credit, has been transparent and pretty consistent in the way it’s treated licensees and stakeholders. To that end, this month, L.A.’s Department of Cannabis Regulation (“DCR”) released a Phase 2 licensing bulletin that’s significantly important for those Phase 2 would-be licensees that seek a temporary license.

Recall, to qualify for Phase II temporary approval/licensing (which triggered priority licensing for existing “non-retailers” like growers and manufacturers) — folks had to meet all of the following criteria:

  1. Engagement prior to January 1, 2016, in the same Non-Retailer Commercial Cannabis Activity for which it sought a license;
  2. Supplier to an Existing Medical Marijuana Dispensary prior to January 1, 2017;
  3. The Business Premises meet all the land use and sensitive use requirements under cannabis laws and the existing City code;
  4. The applicant’s premises have to pass a pre­-license inspection without any fire or life safety violations either;
  5. All outstanding City business tax obligations were paid to the City and the Applicant had to indemnify the City;
  6. Provision to the City of a written agreement with a testing laboratory for testing all Cannabis and Cannabis products and attests to testing all its Cannabis and Cannabis products in accordance with state standards;
  7. Attestation that the Applicant would cease all operations if denied a State license or City License, and the Applicant cannot do any retail activity at its premises;
  8. Qualification under the City’s Social Equity Program (see here for more info); and
  9. Attestation that the Applicant will comply with all operating requirements imposed by DCR and that DCR may immediately suspend or revoke the temporary approval if the Applicant fails to abide by any City operating requirement.
Number 4 above was causing a lot of heartburn amongst Phase II license applicants in that they didn’t really know what to expect. Pre-licensing inspections can be fairly labor intensive depending on the state of the property at issue versus the build out and business plans of a given applicant, and each City has a different standard for a passing grade. In L.A., pre-licensing inspection (which is a pre-requisite to temporary approval) “may include, but is not limited to [an inspection of the business premises by], employees or agents of the following City or county departments: DCR, Building and Safety, Police Department, Fire Department and Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.” And a pre-License inspection consists of, but is not limited to, the following: “approval of the premises diagram; on-site inspection of all applicable building code and fire code requirements; approval of the security plan; fingerprinting; and approval of the fire safety plan (if applicable).”

Plus, applicants must upgrade all applicable electrical and water systems to Building and Fire Code standards before their application will move forward. Again, this is no small task depending on how your building is holding up/what its previous uses and occupancies were.

Temporary approval in L.A. is essential for applicants to also apply for and receive their temporary licenses from the state, which will not be given out or renewed after December 31. This month, L.A. thankfully illuminated for Phase II applicants what to expect for pre-licensing inspections in the City. In its bulletin, the City states:

To be eligible for Phase 2 Priority Processing, among other requirements, an applicant must pass two inspections. One is a DCR inspection to confirm that the applicant’s business premises is built out to substantially match its business premises diagram (i.e., the location and layout of entry points, interior doorways, rooms and walkways match the diagram) and that the business premises is sufficiently secured. The other is a Los Angeles Fire Department Cannabis Unit inspection to confirm that the applicant’s business premises and operations comply with the Los Angeles Fire Code.

The onus here is on the applicant to confirm for the City that it’s ready for pre-licensing inspection. In addition, when DCR confirms a date for an applicant’s inspection, the applicant will be asked to provide its most up-to-date premises diagrams to the DCR (including showing. accurate placement of security cameras). The bottom line of the City’s bulletin is that the physical premises be substantially similar to the premises diagram submitted to the DCR and that the premises be sufficiently secured per City and state law. During the inspection, the DCR will:

  • Walk through each room or area in the premises and assess whether its layout and location is substantially similar to the premises diagram;
  • Determine whether surveillance cameras are recording all areas required to be under surveillance (practically, this is anywhere on the business premises where cannabis goods will be present at any point in time);
  • Determine whether the surveillance system is in a secured area, is functional and can play back recordings upon request; and
  • Determine whether the premises are equipped with a functioning alarm system.

Another big question in L.A. was what the DCR would do with premises that are not 100% built out. The bulletin tells us that:

DCR will inspect the built out area and if all other Phase 2 eligibility requirements are met, grant Temporary Approval for cannabis activities limited to that specific area. Once the remaining areas of the premises are built out, DCR will send out an inspection team again before authorizing cannabis activities in those areas. However, given the large number of Phase 2 eligibility inspections to complete, DCR cannot provide a timeline for when it will be able to schedule a second inspection for an applicant.”

All of this means that it is best to be fully built out (in accordance with your premises diagram and with the fire and safety code) and ready for inspection if you want to get your temporary approval in L.A. anytime soon for your entire facility.

On inspection, also don’t expect to sweet talk the DCR investigator or to learn about the status of your application. Neither will advance your cause with the DCR at this point. Instead, applicants should proceed with business as usual in a professional manner and be as helpful as possible to the DCR investigators and to LAFD.

Source: https://www.cannalawblog.com/icymi-los-angeles-updates-its-phase-2-cannabis-licensing-process/

 

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