Cannabis Home Grows in Washington State: The Jury is Still Out

, , Leave a comment

 

Washington Cannabis
Washington homegrown cannabis

The Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board recently issued a report on recreational cannabis home grows to the Washington State Legislature without making a specific recommendation as to whether the state should legalize recreational home cultivation. Instead, the LCB analyzed the following  three proposed option (which options we discussed here):

  1. Tightly Regulated Recreational Marijuana Home Grows. This option would impose a strict regulatory framework. Home cultivators would need a permit to grow legally. Permit holders could then purchase plants from licensed producers. Each household would be allowed four plants and all plants would be tracked in the same traceability system used to monitor commercially grown cannabis.  The LCB would impose requirements to ensure security and to prevent youth access and diversion. Both the LCB and local authorities would monitor home grows. Cannabis processing would be subject to the same restrictions as apply to medical cannabis (e.g., no combustible processing).
  2. Local Control of Recreational Marijuana Home Grows. Like Option One, this option would require a permit, require safeguards to prevent diversion, limit each household to four plants, and allow permit holders to purchase plants from producers. Option Two would not require home cultivators to use the State’s traceability system. It also would give greater authority to local jurisdictions to create more restrictions and to authorize, control, and enforce the homegrown program.
  3. Recreational Home Grows are Prohibited. The third option is to maintain the status quo and prohibit home cultivation.

The Board weighed the benefits and drawbacks of each measure. A tightly regulated system provided in the first option would address concerns over traceability and public safety but would require allocating significant resources to monitor home grows. The second option would allow local governments to control home cultivation but could result in inconsistent and confusing rules and regulations across the state. The third option would mean the state would not need to implement a new system but would continue allocating resources to prohibit home cultivation.

The LCB contacted cannabis regulators from Colorado, Oregon, and Rhode Island. Colorado and Oregon allow for recreational home cultivation (along with all other states that have legalized recreational marijuana) and Rhode Island permits medical home cultivation with tight regulations. Colorado’s constitution provides a right to home cultivation. The Colorado State Legislature expressed concerns about large home grows as the law originally allowed for up to 99 plants in a home and in 2017, Colorado limited that number to 12 plants per home. Oregon citizens can grow up to four plants generally but can grow more after obtaining a permit or a doctor authorization. Oregon recommended a low number of plants if recreational grows are allowed. Rhode Island expressed concerns over diversion and created a strictly regulated home grow system where all grows must be permitted and plants traced in the traceability system.

The Washington Board also spoke to the Association of Washington Cities, Washington State Association of Counties, the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs, the Department of Social and Health Services, Department of Health, Washington Healthy Youth Coalition, and received public comment through a public hearing and written comments. The LCB reports that law enforcement generally opposed implementing a home cultivation program as it could create public health and safety concerns, including diversion of legally grown product to the illicit market. Law enforcement officials also expressed concern over whether the state could regulate home grows as individuals are afforded privacy protections in their homes that can prevent law enforcement officers from inspections. Other state agencies expressed concerns about children accessing cannabis grown in their homes.

The report emphasizes Washington’s compliance with the Cole Memo through a tightly regulated system, stating that recent changes made by the legislature continue “to add public safety measures to the system rather than making it more lax.” It summarized the viability of home grows as follows:

If the maximum plant number is kept very low, the less of an overall impact there may be to a regulated system and diversion to feed the illicit market and marijuana being exported to other states. While the majority of people may likely follow the rules, there may be those who will intentionally not stay within legal requirements with the goal of engaging in the illicit market.

The Board also emphasized the need for clear regulation if the State allows recreational home cultivation:

The more clearly and simply the parameters are drawn – how many plants a person may have, definitions of a plant and the level of maturity of plants a person may have, restrictions on when a person is illegally growing vs. legally growing – the less overall impact to the regulated system and the greater the enforceability of home grows, thus supporting the tenets of the Cole Memo. This greater enforceability does not completely abate enforcement concerns.

The LCB’s analysis will now be used by the Washington State legislature to implement a program to legalize home cultivation or to uphold the status quo. Washington’s legislative session starts in January and we’ll continue to write about the status of homegrown cannabis in the Evergreen State.

Right now the jury is definitely still out.

Source: https://www.cannalawblog.com/cannabis-home-grows-in-washington-state-the-jury-is-still-out/

 

Leave a Reply